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General Gaming / Re: Dishonored II
« Last post by MysterD on Today at 06:09:42 PM »
VG 247 - Arkane Studios news:
https://www.vg247.com/2018/08/14/arkane-dishonored-3-the-crossing/

Arkane is taking a break from Dishonored.
Future Arkane games likely will also have some kind of seamless multi-player elements.
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General Discussion / Re: Monitors
« Last post by MysterD on Today at 04:35:19 PM »
There are other problems also w/ V-Sync ON.

Input lag. If it's waiting for frames to sync-up perfectly b/c it's got too many frames produced - boom, input lag. Can really affect your gameplay and also throw you off w/ your controls, movement, and whatnot.

You can get also stuttering from V-Sync On, if your framerate goes below your monitor's refresh rate. Big hits on framerates also don't help either, as you can get slapped w/ stuttering from that.

Bethesda Engine Games from their overly duct-taped engine (i.e. Fallout 3/4/NV & Skyrim) definitely can be hit w/ all of this stuff.

V-Sync ON is normally best when you have a framerate matching your monitor and you lose NOTHING - i.e. when you will always remain at 60fps on your 60hz monitor.

FreeSync is an open-solution for Syncing. AMD supports it, though NVidia doesn't. So for now, it's only for AMD cards. But, not all FreeSync monitors are created equal, as there's no real guideline or curating done on them. No royalties in FreeSync either. My 4K monitor supports FreeSync - but eh, NVidia doesn't support it officially.

G-Sync is NVidia's solution for Syncing. It's expensive and it's great; I have it on my SC15 laptop. Input lag is at a minimum, frame stuttering is minimized & there's no screen tearing. It's the best Syncing method out there - and it really shows, as it's pricey as hell. This is something NVidia actually curates and has a special module that they developed that gets put in the monitor, which is in there to help control the frames and work along with the GPU in tandem to keep issues to a minimum. G-Sync works w/ the GPU for variable framerates. Plus, G-Sync is how they make $ with royalties, too - so, yup, that's all why it's so pricey.

IMHO, there's nothing like running a fast-paced action game like Prey 2017 at 120hz w/ 120fps w/ G-Sync, taking a hit down to 90fps, and it feels like nothing ever happened (no stutter, no issues, no tearing, nothing) and it still runs smooth like it never took a hit (since you're above 60fps and likely won't notice the other extra frames, when you go over 60fps). I notice & feel the hits w/out G-Sync when I go from say 60fps down to 50fps, but don't notice or feel them when going from 120fps to 90fps w/ G-Sync. Nothing like G-Sync, IMHO.
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General Gaming / Re: No Man's Sky
« Last post by MysterD on Today at 04:16:28 PM »
Hey, I moved this discussion to the Monitors thread in the General Discussion board.  Don't want to hijack the NMS thread too much.

Sounds good & fair to me.
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General Gaming / Re: No Man's Sky
« Last post by Cobra951 on Today at 12:48:21 PM »
In general, some thoughts.

. . .

Hey, I moved this discussion to the Monitors thread in the General Discussion board.  Don't want to hijack the NMS thread too much.
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General Discussion / Re: Monitors
« Last post by Cobra951 on Today at 12:41:02 PM »
In general, some thoughts.

V-Sync is a waste, unless you get lots of tearing. You lose too many frames, using V-Sync and all. If you have little to no tearing, use a program like MSI Afterburner or NVidia Inspector and cap it to 60fps, if you don't take crazy roller-coaster type of hits that go up and down a lot (i.e. go from 60 to 25fps then up to 45fps then back to 30fps then...well, you get the drift).

Adaptive Sync is not a bad idea either, as long as it ain't bouncing b/t back and forth with 60fps and 30fps all the time.

FastSync is good too for Nvidia users - but, you have to make sure still don't get graphical tearing. It's like running No Sync, but you get "useless" frames thrown out. Doesn't always work, though - as it did not play nice w/ Homefront: The Revolution for me. When using it - cap to 60fps (or wherever you like) w/ Afterburner or Nvidia Inspector.

G-Sync monitors are great for NVidia users, if you're willing to afford that expense in terms of $$ - since you don't get tearing & you really don't want to lose performance/frames.

Thanks for those tips.  As long as the hardware performs as well as needed or better, I like sticking to vsync.  For the last 2 years, that's been the case, because of my lower resolution.  Very little trouble maintaining a locked 60 fps on everything I've been playing.  Now I'm going to have to make compromises in some cases, and as luck would have it, the game I'm into right now seems a tough, unoptimized case.

Thing is I hate tearing and flagging.  I'll put up with them when I have no choice, but I'm not going to suffer through them when I don't.  Your approach, it seems to me, practically guarantees those nasties in true fullscreen mode.  And a hard 60 fps cap imposed in an app often makes it more difficult for the system to maintain that frame rate than it is with triple-buffering and vsync.  With the latter, the process can get slightly ahead of the game when able, giving it more wiggle room.

The whole purpose of Adaptive Sync is to prevent the sudden drop from 60 to 30 fps.  If the system can't generate a frame in under 16.7 ms, it will skip the sync on it.  Theoretically anyway.  I don't really know the inner workings.

I actually saw some Freesync and GSync monitors while searching around, and at Microcenter as well.  They were all too expensive, and higher-res than I wanted.  Pretty soon, I imagine anything that isn't a cheapie will be 1440p or 4K.
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General Gaming / Re: No Man's Sky
« Last post by MysterD on Today at 04:04:14 AM »
In general, some thoughts.

V-Sync is a waste, unless you get lots of tearing. You lose too many frames, using V-Sync and all. If you have little to no tearing, use a program like MSI Afterburner or NVidia Inspector and cap it to 60fps, if you don't take crazy roller-coaster type of hits that go up and down a lot (i.e. go from 60 to 25fps then up to 45fps then back to 30fps then...well, you get the drift).

Adaptive Sync is not a bad idea either, as long as it ain't bouncing b/t back and forth with 60fps and 30fps all the time.

FastSync is good too for Nvidia users - but, you have to make sure still don't get graphical tearing. It's like running No Sync, but you get "useless" frames thrown out. Doesn't always work, though - as it did not play nice w/ Homefront: The Revolution for me. When using it - cap to 60fps (or wherever you like) w/ Afterburner or Nvidia Inspector.

G-Sync monitors are great for NVidia users, if you're willing to afford that expense in terms of $$ - since you don't get tearing & you really don't want to lose performance/frames.
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General Gaming / Re: No Man's Sky
« Last post by Cobra951 on Yesterday at 11:46:04 AM »
Yeah, I'm hooked.  Like, seriously.  This really scratches my OCD itch.  It's repetitive and grind-heavy, but I just can't help myself.  Find more planets, explore them, scan and mine everything for profit, spend profits on new ships and upgrades for everything.  Got me a neato Exotic ship now.  Got a freighter, and 5 other ships that dock in it, mostly for their inventory space.  (The inventory system is downright punitive in this game.)  I've warped to several new star systems, learned many alien words, teleported back and forth across discovered systems, and am now following The Atlas Path (wherever that may lead).

The game did not like the bump in resolution to 1080p on my new screen.  Not one bit.  Frame rate dropped below 60 at least half the time, the GPU temp went up to 65 C, and within about a half-hour, I experienced my first and so-far only crash in over 50 hours of play time.  It's possible that leaving the res set at 1360x768 while playing in windowed-borderless mode (which forced it to 1920x1080) broke something in the code math.  I didn't mean to.  I just launched the game after the monitor switch, and it came up at the native res.  Don't know the cause, but I did not like how unoptimized the code felt anyway, so I switched to exclusive fullscreen, and left the original res setting alone.  Back to flawless 60 fps, and that matters more to me than the significant bump in sharpness at 1080p.  I later tried 1600x900, but for some idiotic reason, it comes up letterboxed with the aspect ratio squashed.  What more obvious 16:9 resolution is there than 1600x900?  Dammit, people.

Anyway, I'm going to have to check out other games at the higher res for performance-loss comparison.  Far Cry 5 seems like a good place to start.



Edit:  OK, so it turns out the big performance killer is windowed borderless mode.  Not an issue at 768p, but certainly is at 1080p.  After trying out Far Cry 5 briefly that way at native res, and shaking my head, I switched to true fullscreen, and it made a world of difference.  While I still get some drops below 60 fps, it behaves very well, and looks amazing.  So I took this new knowledge to No Man's Sky, and it still couldn't handle 1080p well enough to suit me.  I ended up choosing a strange resolution: 1728x972.  It looks almost as sharp as 1080p, and performs acceptably well.  No crashes so far.  I changed vsync to adaptive, which also helped, at the expense of some tearing.  It does look a hell of a lot better.  I have a feeling the game wasn't using the sharper textures at the lower res.  I'm seeing some details that I know I didn't see before, even when up close.  Little by little, I'm settling into this big change.  I had gotten so used to my old screen, for over a decade.  (So long, old friend.)
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Entertainment / Re: "What Movies Have You Seen Lately?" Thread
« Last post by scottws on Yesterday at 09:26:17 AM »
I totally forgot about Tag. I need to see that.
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General Discussion / Re: Monitors
« Last post by Cobra951 on Sunday, August 12, 2018, 10:57:13 PM »
Well, my trusty 11-year-old Samsung 23" TV died.  I woke up at around 3:30 AM to see . . . nothing!  The audio from some satellite station was still playing, but all I could see was a dim backlit rectangle.  Nothing I tried for over an hour brought it back.  No display of any kind, including the OSD.  My guess is that enough dust accumulated on the electronic innards through the top vents to finally overheat the display chip and fry it.  RIP!

So I stayed up another hour on my laptop (thank God I got one around last Christmas) scouring the monitor offerings listed in the Microcenter site.  I narrowed it down to 2, and ended up with this ASUS 279QL after checking it out at my local MC store.  Pretty much exactly what I wanted, given that it was going to be a monitor and not a full TV.  27" with almost no bezel, it's only slightly wider than the 23" Samsung.  1080p, 60 Hz, though I've read it can be driven at 75 Hz.  It's either IPS or AMVA+, depending on where you go read about it.  Rock-steady colors at all viewing angles, with brightness dropping off as they get extreme.  Beautiful picture, with 6 different presets intended for different purposes.  All but one (sRGB) are user-modifiable.  HDMI, DisplayPort and D-Sub (VGA) inputs, separately selectable in the OSD.  Digital audio through HDMI and DP, with audio out through a standard headphone jack.  (Internal speakers suck, as usual.)  I went with DP, and the sound through my Logitech 2.1's is so much better than the integrated analog audio I've been getting for nearly 2 years.  I was expecting higher dynamic range (a much better noise floor and no harsh distortion for loud SFX), but I was not prepared for the much-tighter bass and overall clarity.

The picture is the real star.  Damn, this thing looks good.  I've spent the better part of the weekend fiddling with settings on both the monitor and Nvidia Control Panel, and I think I'm finally coming to grips with how to make it look its best.  I need basically 2 modes: one that looks good when doing what I'm doing right now without searing my retinas, and another for balls-to-the-wall high contrast for games, movies, TV shows, etc.  I'm almost there.  Still tweaking, but pretty happy.

The surprise was the stand.  This thing allows 4 degrees of motion: height, and 3 axes of rotation.  It can be turned around into portrait mode (9:16).  I doubt I'll ever use that, but who knows.

The sharpness, contrast and size are such great improvements.  The downside is no legacy analog connections, and no TV.  Since I went with DP, I could get an HDMI hub, and use it to plug in both the Xbox One and the 360.  For now, I will probably just plug in the One (haven't bothered yet).  The Wii will probably go into the closet.  I haven't even turned it on in years, but it still feels like a casualty.  the PS2 was disconnected long ago.  I will probably get a cheap TV, and run the coax to it, at some point.  Come to think of it, I can borrow the little one in the kitchen.  Now I just need to find something to prop it up on in my room.

Edit:  A couple more details:  Response time is 5 ms, and input lag, according to this review, is 12 ms.  Every official description I've read says that cables beyond VGA are optional, but that's not the case.  I got HDMI, DisplayPort and audio cables, and several adapters, most notably HDMI to DVI and full-size HDMI to mini.  Come to think of it, I think the only thing I didn't get was VGA.  I'll have to look in the bag of goodies to be sure.
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Entertainment / Re: "What Movies Have You Seen Lately?" Thread
« Last post by Cobra951 on Sunday, August 12, 2018, 10:13:10 PM »
I kinda figure it had to be an incomplete story.  I just didn't know it until the credits rolled.  If movies are no longer going to be complete stories, they need to have numbers, like "2 of 3".  My comic-book days are long gone, and it totally blindsided me.  I felt so used.

Hey, watch Tag.  I haven't had this much fun with a movie in a long time.  It isn't perfect.  Nothing is.  But, ha!  It's close.
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